Listing of the Marbled Murrelet on Oregon’s Endangered Species List

A Resolution by the Oregon Logging Conference Opposing the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commissions Consideration of Listing the Marbled Murrelet on Oregon’s endangered species list.

WHEREAS, In 2018 the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission decided NOT to “up-list” the Marbled Murrelet from threatened to endangered

WHEREAS, In 2019 the USFWS concluded a 5-year status review of the Marbled Murrelet and determined that up-listing was not warranted- primarily due to stable population trends across Washington, Oregon, and California, as well as increasing habitat across the same range

WHEREAS, On December 6, 2019, the Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission voted to reconsider the status of the Marbled Murrelet in response to a Lane County court case filed by activist groups

WHEREAS, Studies done by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service between 2000 and 2018 show that the Marbled Murrelet population in Oregon is growing by 1.8% per year

WHEREAS, Older forest structure has been on the rise in Oregon for decades since the original listing of both the Northern Spotted Owl and the Marbled Murrelet, in fact since 1995 coastal forests have added an average of 64,710 acres of trees 50 years or older each year according to the National Council for Air and Stream Improvement

WHEREAS, Many Oregon timberland owners are committed to long term management but an up-listing of the Marbled Murrelet will drive short term decisions and premature harvest of timber

WHEREAS, Up-listing of the Marbled Murrelet could impact access to public lands

WHEREAS, Conservation goals can be achieved without an endangered species listing

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that The Oregon Logging Conference go on record in opposition to the up-listing of the Marbled Murrelet from threatened to endangered.

This resolution will be presented by Heidi Leib, Logging Contract Coordinator for Boise Cascade.  Heidi is responsible for purchasing and managing federal timber sales and overseeing log quality. She is based in Willamina, OR

Leib has also worked for Hancock Forest Management as a silviculture forester and harvest operations manager in northeast Washington. Before entering the private sector she worked for the Idaho Department of Lands and the Washington Department of Natural Resources as a forester, and for the Oregon Department of Forestry as a wildland firefighter.

Her introduction to logging came when she was on the Oregon State University College of Forestry student logging team, which also fueled her passion for the wood products industry.

Leib has a Bachelor of Science degree in Natural Resources from OSU and is a current member of the Oregon Logging Conference. She is also a committee member of the Beaver chapter of Ducks Unlimited and an alumnus of REAL Oregon.